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nutrition

The Pug – A little bundle of fun

The Pug – A little bundle of fun……with very specific features
Despite the dignified, even anxious molossoid appearance, the Pug can’t hide his happy, affectionate, totally loyal – even exclusive – nature for long! As a result of discussions with breeders keen to support a charming breed, and the benefit of scientific advances in terms of nutrition, Royal Canin launches a new food dedicated to the breed: PUG 25.

A charmer

The Pug is undoubtedly the oldest of the small molossoid breeds, with historians reporting its existence fornutrition two or three thousand years. Originally from China and sharing the same origins as the Mastiff or Tibetan Mastiff, the Pug arrived in Europe via Holland in the 16th century. The breed quickly became a favourite in the royal courts, before it was supplanted by the Pekinese and terriers. It was not until the 1960s that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor restored the breed to royal favour.

A delicate skin which needs care…

The Pug’s short hair clearly displays his skin, which is folded around the face. These folds can retain natural humidity in the skin and encourage the appearance of cutaneous irritation. Regular cleaning is necessary for good hygiene, and food can also contribute to good health: A patented complex of four B vitamins and an amino acid help reinforce the effectiveness of the cutaneous barrier. Omega 3 fatty acids, EPA-DHA from fish oil and vitamin A have supportive anti-inflammatory action.

A face with no comparison…

Carried on a large, round head, the short muzzle is completely square and not turned up. The jaw is characteristically brachycephalic, with slight lower prognathism, and the incisors are implanted almost in a straight line. In fact, picking up an object or food that is too flat is very difficult, and the Pug has a tendency to swallow his food without crunching.

A characteristic physique

The Pug’s compact form shows off crisp, firm muscles. Regular, gentle walks, avoiding strong heat and intense effort, are enough to keep him in shape when combined with the right food, served in the right amount, and not too many treats. Regular, gentle exercise is also good for the digestive system.

The complete food…

This little dog has relatively long life expectancy, and regular veterinary checks and a specially adapted diet can help make this long life a comfortable one. Royal Canin offers a complete diet for Pugs – PUG 25, which is based on ultradigestible (90 percent) proteins and a combination of fibres to stimulate transite and protect the intestinal flora. It is enriched with antioxidants which are effective against free radicals: vitamins E and C, taurine, active plant extracts such as luteine and grape polyphenols.

breed profile

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: the little bundle of endless joy

An active, graceful, well-balanced dog, very gay and free in action, fearless and sporting in character, yet at the same time gentle and affectionate…that’s how a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is. Come fall in love with this wonderful breed.

A royal heritage…

“History tells us that King Charles II was seldom seen without two or three spaniels at his heels. So fond wasbreed profile King Charles II of his little dogs, he wrote a decree that the King Charles Spaniel should be accepted in any public place, even in the Houses of Parliament where animals were not usually allowed. This decree is still in existence today in England. As time went by, and with the coming of the Dutch Court, Toy Spaniels went out of fashion and were replaced in popularity by the Pug. One exception was the strain of red and white Toy Spaniels that was bred at Blenheim Palace by various Dukes of Marlborough. This Spaniel was later known as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and this particular colour, which is still very popular and common, was named after the Blenheim Palace and is called the Blenheim colour. These dogs were also very common with the French ladies and were used as lap warmers,” told Dinkar.

Loving and lovable…

“The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a delightfully affectionate, playful, intelligent little dog who repays his owner’s care and attention with an endearing devotion,” told Dinkar. Cavaliers are not kennel dogs and do not like to be left alone. Because of four hundred years of close contact with their owners and their development as lap dogs, they make wonderful companions. They are happy, outgoing, loving little dogs who want to love you and be loved, to run and play in a safe place, and to sleep in a soft bed – preferably their owners, but they’re willing to negotiate on that point! They get along well with children, cats, and other dogs.

Physical attributes…

The skull is slightly rounded, but without a dome or peak. It should appear flat because of the high placement of the ears. Eyes are large, round and set well apart. The colour is very dark brown, giving a lustrous, limpid look. There is a slight cushioning under the eyes, which contributes much to the sweet, gentle expression characteristic of the breed. The muzzle is well tapered, well covering the mouth level and lips. Ears are set high, but not close, on top of the head. They are long, with plenty of silky feathering, and wide enough so that when the dog is alert, the ears fan slightly forward to frame the face. His long and silky coat is very soft to the touch and is free from curl, though a slight wave is permissible. Feathering on ears, legs and tail is long, and the feathering on the feet is a feature of the breed. Their height is around 12 to 13 inches at the withers and the weight, proportionate to height, between 13 and 18 pounds.

They are available in four colours – Blenheim (rich chestnut markings well broken up on a pearly white ground), tricolour (jet black markings well-broken up on a pearly white ground), whole-coloured rich red and jet black with rich tan markings over the eyes, on cheeks, inside ears, on chest, legs, and underside of tail.

Bundle of energy…

Cavaliers are active and sporting little dogs who require regular exercise. They have an instinct to give chase to just about anything that moves, and should either be on a leash or in a fenced yard in which to run. They should get a minimum of two good walks each day (in addition to potty walks). If their owners want walking companions, Cavaliers can build up over time to much longer walks. Regular exercise is recommended. “But, if you are a couch potato, they will share that with delight and if you like to walk for miles on end, they will equally delightedly do that,” told Gabriele G Pollmeier.

Living with children…

Cavaliers love to interact with their owners and enjoy activity and play, making them especially close friends and confidants for children. They are excellent with children, but the age of the children is an important factor in choosing a puppy. Because Cavalier puppies are so small, it is better to get a young puppy only if the family has children above the age of five. An older puppy or adult dog will be more suitable for such families. All children, of course, need supervision to ensure they do not hurt the pup/dog.

Taking care of puppy…

Just like any other puppy or small animal, feed excellent food only, keep lots of fresh clean water available, play with the puppy when he is awake, and let him sleep when tired and do not disturb when he sleeps. Give him plenty of attention and training. Do not scold or punish him, added Gabriele.

Living with other pets…

Cavaliers are the ultimate groupies and are usually delighted to have the company of cats and dogs of any size. If you have a large dog, you will need to watch your Cavalier puppy carefully while he is small. Because Cavaliers are spaniels with a strong sporting instinct, they should be watched closely around birds and other small animals as well. In households where no one is home during the day, the companionship of another dog or a cat is highly recommended.

Groom me beautiful…

The Cavalier does require regular grooming. A great deal of time and effort is not necessary if the dog is brushed and combed thoroughly at least once a week. Knots and tangles are kept to a minimum if the Cavalier is free of parasites and combed regularly. Ears need particular attention and should be checked and given a quick combing every few days and daily in shedding season.

Cavaliers do shed, particularly in spring and fall. They also shed a little all the time. Their nails should be clipped and the hair between their pads trimmed once a month. Cavaliers are naturally clean dogs.

Health…

All dog breeds have their own set of health problems that they may have, so does this breed. Some of them are Heart Murmurs, Mitral Valve Disease and Syringomyelia (SM) is rapidly emerging as a severe inherited condition in Cavaliers. It is a progressive neurological disease that varies in severity. Hence it is important that one buys a pup from a reputed breeder.

On a concluding note…

“They do very well as therapy dogs as well as dogs for handicapped people. They are excellent dogs for the elderly and for young children,” told Gabriele. “I personally feel this breed is perfect for most types of people except for the extreme outdoor person. They adapt really well to apartment living and love being with people. Unlike most small dogs, they are not snappy, protective and that noisy,” concluded Dinkar.

(With inputs from Dinkar Singh, he has recently introduced the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel for the first time in India and Gabriele G Pollmeier, AnGa’s Star Kennels & Eulenburg Cavalier King Charles Spaniels; www.angasstar.com).

My loving Cavaliers – always like puppies
My two-year-old son just adores our first Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who came to us when she was barely two months old. They love playing together, but we take care that he does not hug her too tight! Our male Cavalier is more sensible and just backs away when he sees that our son wants to hug and kiss him. They are totally house and lap dogs and just love to sleep with us in the bed. The female likes to sleep on our pillows and inside the quilt where as the male loves to sleep behind the pillow with his head on the pillow. They are very gentle dogs in a small very manageable size and look so sweet like puppies even now when both of them are more or less adults.

– Dinkar Singh

6 tips to bring home the pawfect bundle of joy

For many households, bringing home a puppy is an impulse thing. Let’s get a puppy, which breed, the discussion starts and finally the hunt begins and ends in no time. But there is much more to it…

Puppy Care

Akbar & Oscar

 

  1. Match the puppy with your lifestyle: Each breed is different, not just in size, colour, coat etc, but in their unique traits which enable them to do a particular type of work. You have to see if those traits match your personality and lifestyle. A mismatch is always uncomfortable, more so for the dog. So don’t just go by the looks of the dog, choose the right breed keeping in mind his requirements and yours.
  2. Choose a responsible breeder: If you are going for a pedigree puppy, choose a reputed breeder who has time to talk to you regarding the breed, his needs, the parents and of course the puppy and his care. A responsible breeder will and should also be interested in the person buying the puppy and how he or she plans to keep him and if it will be a good match. The breeder should not just be interested in selling the pup.
  3. Do not just pick up the puppy on impulse: Most people see a litter of adorable pups and choose the one who looks sweet, without even realizing if that puppy is suitable for them or not. In fact, you can determine the personality of a puppy by seeing how he behaves in the litter. For example, an over-confident pup may be a handful for some to handle.
  4. Get him home at the right age: Age does play a vital role in the pup’s/dog’s personality to be developed in the coming months and year. I have been noticing that when pups are taken away at about six or less weeks of age they mostly tend to have some behavioural problems. The right age to get a puppy is at least eight weeks. The reason for this is that the mother and the siblings teach the pup a lot during this time and it is very important for them to be together.
  5. Weaned off: Pick up a pup only when he is weaned off mother’s milk.
  6. Be ready to pay the right price: Another important observation is that generally breeders tend to try and sell their pups as soon as possible. This is because as the pups grow, they need a lot of care and the cost of feeding them can go up quite a bit, especially in giant breeds. At times, this is also heightened by the prospective puppy owners as they want a cheap puppy, so if you cut out the rearing part of the puppy which should be done by the breeder, you can get a cheaper puppy as the cost is then transferred to the new owner. But that is not right. Quality does come for a price and prospective owners should be ready to pay for it as the puppy they buy will generally live for the next 10 plus years with them and hence they should get a mentally sound, pure bred and genetically healthy puppy rather than an unhealthy one who may have problems later on in life, whether medical or behavioural.

Happy hunting!!

(Dinkar Singh has kept Rottweilers for about 20 odd years with occasionally showing and breeding. He has recently introduced the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel for the first time in India. Dogs are his passion and hobby, not his business.)

nutrition

The Pug : A little bundle of fun with very specific features… “Multan in Parvo”

Despite the dignified, even anxious appearance, the Pug can’t hide his happy, affectionate, totally loyal – even exclusive – nature for long! Lots of love and care is needed to keep him healthy and happy. Royal Canin has launched Pug 25 – a food totally dedicated to the breed.

Evolved with time

Sometimes unruly as a youngster, firm, kind training turns him into a totally calm and level-headed dog. His nutritionsquare (cobby) muscled physique means he plays with calm poise and dignity. The Pug is undoubtedly the oldest of the small molossoid breeds, with historians reporting his existence for two or three thousand years. Originally from China and sharing the same origins as the Mastiff or Tibetan Mastiff, the Pug arrived in Europe via Holland in the 16th century. The breed quickly became a favourite in royal courts, before it was supplanted by the Pekingese and Terriers. It was not until the 1960s that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor restored the breed to royal favour.

A delicate skin which needs care…

The Pug’s short hair clearly displays his skin, which is folded around the face as the breed standard requires. These folds can retain natural humidity in the skin and encourage the appearance of cutaneous irritation. Regular cleaning is necessary for good hygiene, and food can also contribute to good health: A patented complex of four B vitamins and an amino acid help reinforce the effectiveness of the cutaneous barrier. Omega 3 fatty acids, EPA-DHA from fish oil and Vitamin A have a supportive anti-inflammatory action.

A face with no comparison…

Carried n a large, round head, the short muzzle is completely square and not turned up. The jaw is characteristically brachycephalic, with slight lower prognathism, and the incisors are implanted almost in a straight line. In fact, picking up an object or food that is too flat is very difficult, and the Pug has a tendency to swallow his food without crunching.

A characteristic physique

The Pug’s compact form shows off his crisp and firm muscles. Regular, gentle walks, avoiding strong heat and intense effort, are enough to keep him in shape when combined with the right food, served in the right amount, and not too many treats. Regular, gentle exercise is also good for the digestive system.

A food…that takes care of all

Today, as a result of discussions with breeders keen to support this charming breed, and the benefit of scientific advances in terms of nutrition, Royal Canin has launched a new food dedicated to the breed:

PUG 25.


PUG 25 is based on ultradigestible (90%) proteins and a combination of fibres to stimulate transite and protect the intestinal flora.

PUG 25 is enriched with antioxidants which are effective against free radicals: Vitamins E and C, taurine, besides active plant extracts such as luteine and grape polyphenols.


This little dog has a relatively long life expectancy, and regular veterinary checks and a specially adapted diet can help make this long life a comfortable one.

Bringing home a bundle of joy!

Whenever you adopt a puppy, you bring home 12-15 years of love, joy and companionship. The puppy gets a new loving home and blesses you with 001unconditional love and loyalty.

While some of you would prefer to adopt a pedigree dog, others might consider adopting our Indian pariahs, who are healthy, sturdy and of course as lovable as any other pedigree dog. You can adopt such pooches from animal shelters in your area. These animal shelters take care of the vaccination and early socialization needs of the puppy and will also guide you towards responsible pet parenting. Alternatively, you can also pick a pup from the streets near your house. There is no doubt, you will be blessed with a beautiful and sturdy canine.

A few will like to adopt a pedigree dog due to liking for a particular breed. For such pet parents, it is important to choose the right breeder. Choose a reputed ethical breeder, for whom puppy-rearing is passion to care for these amazing friends. Once you choose the breeder, take full information about the puppy you wish to adopt, including his lineage, his vaccination, his feeding charts, etc. Also, take a look at his parents and see if cleanliness in kennel is maintained. He should be able to give you full information about the breed, the pup’s family history and guide you on how to take care of the breed.

Once you are smitten by a pup, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t bring that pup home and give him your love ‘n’ care. Pedigree or stray – some things remain common – the love and devotion that one gets by adopting a puppy.

Sparkle is also nodding his head in approval and he is really happy to see lovely doggies living happily with their pet parents. He also wishes you all a safe and prosperous Diwali with your near and dear one.

– Shweta

Bundle of joy- indeed!

Whenever I saw the Hutch ad, I would marvel at the cute little doggie (Pug) and wonder if such dogs actually existed. Never did I imagine that I simbawould be the parent of a similar one!!

On 13th September, I was sleeping after coming back from school when my dad came into my room, hiding something behind his back. And then suddenly popped out the cutest lil’ Pug puppy- my Pug puppy!!

I knew from that very day that I am going to actually LIVE my dream…when I come back from school now, I do not just head for the bed, because I have an excited little Bundle of Joy waiting for me, yelping with happiness, welcoming me heartily.

Bundle is the cuddliest little thing I have ever seen. I can hold him close when I am upset, play with him when I am happy, and I can just spend hours looking at him, watching him play. He did take a long time, though, to get toilet-trained, and sometimes we still end up with accidents in my bedroom. But, he is very close to my heart and nothing upsets me.

Bundle grunts, whines, and makes noises to vocalize his emotions…and even mutters in defi ance!

Life with “bundi’ is amazing and I would like to thank my mom, sister, and maid for helping me look after him and making my dream come true.

Sherry – our bundle of joy

Life hasn’t been the same since this bundle of joy named Sherry (Labrador) came into our lives. Sherry completed our family.
Sherry was a winter baby. She came to us in winters, when she was less than a month old. It was a major task to keep her warm. For first few weeks, the whole house was decorated with newspapers. Within a month, she was successfully trained to use one of the toilets in the house, so well that for a long time she did not know how to do it in the natural surroundings.

Sherry slowly transformed into one “Demolition” devil and chewed all furniture, chappals, shoes, mobiles, etc. She would collect all her treasures and hide them. At one stage we were all walking about in half chewed slippers and mismatched pair of socks!

My cooking skills are always under microscopic examination, but Sherry makes me feel as if I am the best cook. She laps up whatever I make for her. My husband accuses that I cook only for Sherry and they have to make do with what they get!

Sherry is very spiritual. Though it is hard to believe but it is true. She sits with me for my morning and evening prayers. Any metal sound sends her into a barking frenzy. But during prayer time, the bell sound does not trouble her! What she really loves is getting her prasad after the puja!

She is a voracious snacker! Anyone eating, she will be there right in front with an expression as if she has been starved for months together. With the result both mother and daughter are perpetually fighting the bulge battle. With two brats at home(Sherry and my son), the house is converted into a skating ring, football field etc. Sherry loves to skate with her food bowl and play fetch. In the best of times, the house looks as if it’s been hit by a typhoon. She loves her outings, specially her car rides. When all of us are traveling, I have to sit in the backseat with her. Even though her side of window is lowered, Sherry insists on sitting on my lap and look outside!

We recently celebrated Sherry’s 1st birthday. It was essentially a thanksgiving for she has filled our lives with so much love, joy, peace, laughter and harmony. We had Sherry’s doggy and human friends over for a lovely celebration.

Thanks to Sherry for teaching us how to give and receive love unconditionally.
– Maya Dwajan, Noida