Feline territorial issues

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Cats are royal companions who like separate space for their own, just like us. Mostly they consider the area where they spend most of their time as their territory and they are always prepared to defend it against other cats – and other animals as well. The same applies to wild cats (lions, tigers, cheetah and leopards) but they live a different life to their smaller cousins and except for those in zoos, they live free in their natural habitats.

Feline monarchs…
Felines rule their area or territory like an emperor and they won’t allow any intruders in this place. They clearly demarcate their territory from the other and build around a safe spot or their home base. Even cats that are companions and live in a home will consider this home to be their territory and often do not like new cats coming into the house.
Their kingdom…
Their kingdom, the home spot, may be one single area, or a series of areas. It is a place for eating, drinking, sleeping, napping, watching the world or playing. For most companion cats, their home base is closely related to their owner’s home whereas home bases for free-roaming cats are generally near the owners’ home or surrounding yards. All cats who live with their human parents still consider that special places in the home to be their territory and guard it against all others. Sometimes it is a windowsill, on top of a particular cupboard, on top of a scratching post or one special room in the house.
Royal food…

Kitty kings are gourmet for food. They generally raise their empire where they get abundance of food and water. More cats can be seen in such places. When little food and water is available then fewer cats will be seen. Male cats who are not neutered will roam a great deal further than males who have been neutered. They are always on the hunt for mate and will fight to the death with any other male.
Cat wars…
Obviously cats who are free and have no home are inclined to seek an area that is theirs alone, as they do not want to share their territory and the food that is available. In the case of feral cats they seek an area where they are in charge and do not have to combat with other feral cats. Unfortunately a cat’s territory must be staked and this can involve physical confrontation with other wild cats. They often make a lot of noise and try to intimidate their opponents but if that does not work, then the battle can be terrifying and a lot of blood shed. Most attacks are directed to the head or tail region and a lot depends on the strength of the individual cat. Wounds are inflicted by teeth and claws but generally once the fight is over, regardless of the winner, they rarely fight with each other again. One part of fighting males and males who roam free is the spraying of urine. This is scent marking and generally used by tomcats. This is to mark their territory and is almost always done on the boundaries of the territory that the cat considers his/ her own.
Prevention is better than cure…
Cats should not be left to roam free, as they can be injured, hit by cars, treated badly by humans and dogs. For this reason, all cats, who are not registered breeding animals, should be neutered and kept indoors, loved and cared for.
Joan E Henderson of Melbourne, Australia has judged furry felines in Australia, USA, Bermuda, Malasya, South Africa, Hong Kong, Philippines and New Zealand.

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